OB ABCs

Month 8

month_08At the age of 8 months, your baby’s curiosity is unparalleled—and while she may not be on the move just yet, the need to baby-proof her environment is quickly approaching.

At the age of 8 months, your baby’s curiosity is unparalleled—and while she may not be on the move just yet, the need to baby-proof her environment is quickly approaching.

When beginning to baby-proof, the goal is to be one step ahead of your baby. Evaluate what areas need to be covered, what items need to be placed higher and what items should be thrown away.

Begin baby-proofing by thinking about covering any necessary items. Take a tour of your house and take a tally of outlet covers needed, cabinets that require child locks and toilets that necessitate locks. While these are some of the basic considerations for childproofing, evaluate your home for these additional hazards:

  • Areas where furniture could tip—no-tip furniture brackets can be purchased
  • Faucets that need covering
  • Sharp corners
  • Large potted plants
  • Windows

Most of these items can be purchased at a discount superstore or home improvement store. You may wish to purchase a few extras—particularly for outlet covers—should you require additional items.

Keep Baby Away From Small Objects

An estimated 17,000 American children younger than 14 are taken to the emergency department for choking each year. In addition to the need for baby-proofing, examining your home for baby’s choking hazards is extremely important. The first major source of choking is surprisingly food itself. As your baby begins to consume solid foods, no food should be cut longer than a half-inch in size. Foods such as hot dogs, grapes, popcorn, peanut butter, string cheese and marshmallows all may pose choking hazards, especially when whole, in children under age 4.

Other common items that a child may reach for include coins, marbles, pen caps and small batteries. It’s a good idea to constantly check under furniture, cushions and any other similar areas to ensure they remain free of these small items.

TIPS

  • Here are a few tips for reigniting your relationship with your spouse after baby:
    • Plan time for intimacy—a happy relationship is the foundation for a happy family.
    • Find new ways to hold hands. While the stroller might get in the way on walks, link arms to keep contact.
    • Don’t forget to kiss—passionately.
    • Be open. Talk about new emotions or feelings with your partner that may have changed or emerged since baby arrived.
  • Your parents and in-laws may be pressing to spend lots of time with baby. While this can be helpful, the pressure of having your baby out of sight might be overwhelming. Choose specific times each week that grandparents can spend with your baby to help create peace of mind for the whole family.