OB ABCs

Week 10

week_10Listening to your body may include heeding cravings for specific nutrients, taking a nap or modifying your exercise regimen. Keeping tuned in to your body’s changes should also help you recognize if something is wrong with the pregnancy.

So far, so good. Although you may be uncomfortable as your body responds to the hormonal changes during the first trimester, you may also feel in great health during your pregnancy. Cherish this time, focusing your actions on the new life growing inside.

Listening to your body may include heeding cravings for specific nutrients, taking a nap or modifying your exercise regimen. Keeping tuned in to your body’s changes should also help you recognize if something is wrong with the pregnancy.

Unspoken Concerns

Unfortunately, in the first trimester one in five pregnancies can end in miscarriage, so it’s hard not to think about your risk. Losing a pregnancy during the first 14 weeks may be due to genetic factors, healthcare problems prior to pregnancy or, quite honestly, for a reason that may never be determined.

Most miscarriages that occur within the first 14 weeks are due to chromosomal abnormalities—problems with the tiny structures contributed by mom and dad that hold the genes for your baby.

Call your healthcare provider immediately if you:

  • Bleed or spot from the vagina
  • Cramp or have lower abdominal pain
  • Feel dizzy
  • Have fluids gush from the vagina
  • Have high fever or illness
  • Pass tissue
  • Swell excessively in the hands or face
  • Vomit continually

Risk Factors in Your Control

Hollywood links miscarriages to dramatic events, such as experiencing a fall, becoming frightened or receiving a blow, but in most cases these are not to blame. Likewise, there is no proof linking aspects of normal daily life—using birth control before pregnancy, exercising, having sex or working while pregnant—to a woman’s increased risk for miscarriage.

Mothers who have uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes are at greater risk for early miscarriages. Smoking mothers and women who drink alcohol and/or use recreational drugs while pregnant also increase their risk for miscarriage.

TIPS

  • If you have a miscarriage, don’t blame yourself. Most miscarriages could not have been prevented and are often the result of a fetus not growing as it should. Don’t give up on motherhood—most women who have a miscarriage later have a healthy pregnancy.
  • As you prepare the nursery, make sure you create a safe sleeping environment for your infant. Infants should always sleep on their backs, alone, in one-piece sleepers with no blankets or anything covering their heads. Keep the crib or pack and play free of toys, blankets, sheepskin or padded bumpers, using only a tight-fitting sheet on the mattress.